more cartoon questions

Spent part of today watching vintage (antique?) cartoons on my parents’ TV.  Here are a few pressing questions:

Why did the Flintstones chisel everything into stone? Cavemen had charcoal smudge sticks, much faster.  And how did their feet stay so clean? They never wore shoes.  The houses seem to be whole rocks chiseled out; much more work than piling stones together.  And Wilma: were really there any redheaded cavewomen? So white, so unhairy, so unsimian.

And then, the Jetsons: why does George have to run between machines in his little office at Sprocket Co.? He has a big funny face master computer; shouldn’t it just tell the other computers what to do? This could be a case of not realizing what technology would become.  When the show was created, in the early 1960’s, computers couldn’t talk to each other like than can now, they were more like giant factory machines than what we have now.  And that’s what Hanna and Barbera drew: big, chunky computers with grids on their screens and giant buttons.  One more question on the Jetsons: do their rocket cars run on oil? Plausible future in 1961, but not today.

I leave you with a quote from Judy Jetson, the only white haired teenage cartoon girl I know: “No! I won’t go to the dance with a man from another century!”

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About emvlovely

Oh, I live in an RV. I write poems, essays and prose. Thanks for reading my blog, good health to you!
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One Response to more cartoon questions

  1. Paul says:

    Q: Why did the Flintstones chisel everything into stone? Cavemen had charcoal smudge sticks, much faster.
    A: They wrote lapidary prose.

    I have no problem with the Jetsons’ anachronistic mainframe. I find the lack of techno-vision in ST:NG far more disappointing. But I suppose an SF writer can’t make things too different from the present for which s/he’s writing, or the audience will have trouble recognizing the similarities between that time and their contemporary time.

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